Athlete Analyzer

Who is Athlete Analyzer Judo for?

by Athlete Analyzer on

That’s a question that we get quite often when we’re meeting interested coaches and athletes. Often, we end up in quite interesting discussions. Some of our visitors think that Athlete Analyzer Judo is for the very top elite level judokas and their coaches. That’s not the case and during our conversations, they often change their minds and think quite different.

We recommend that judokas start using Athlete Analyzer Judo from 13-14 years and up. In this age, the judoka starts to reflect more about his or her judo and is quite often also changing their judo accordingly to their body growth. Athlete Analyzer Judo makes it easy to highlight both their strengths and weaknesses and that is a strong motivational factor for further training. It’s also easy to spot unwanted patterns like picking up unnecessary shidos during contests. So, it’s a good thing starting as pre-cadet to form a baseline for future training and analysis. But, this is of course quite depending on the ambition level of the judoka.

As the judoka mowing up through cadet and junior level the system makes it easier to get new insights. Some techniques that worked well earlier gets a lower efficiency, new techniques prove to work more efficiently during contests. They also increase their complimentary training making the training plans more complex than before. In this age, they are also more likely to have more coaches around them then before. Maybe they enter a regional team or hopefully even the national team. If the judoka has used AAJ since before the new coaches will have a veritable goldmine of information and can very quickly help the judoka towards their next level.

What about the coaches? Well, AAJ makes collaboration between coaches easier as they can help each other. One coach can plan judo sessions, another coach can plan the strength training and another the cardio within the club. All in one place and easily shared with the judokas. It’s also possible to collaborate between different levels. For instance, a cadet national coach will of course share the training plan to the national cadet team but the coach he can also share the same plan to club coaches. The club coaches can easily adjust the plan accordingly to suit the club and then share it to all cadets in the club. In this way, it’s easy to spread “best practice” among clubs in a country. It’s not always necessary to invent the wheel over and over again.

One thing we all agree on – you never stop learning judo, whatever your current level. There’s always something that can be improved even further and Athlete Analyzer Judo makes it a lot easier as it let the coaches support all their judokas a lot more, in less time.

Athlete Analyzer

Athlete Analyzer

The Athlete Analyzer Team
Athlete Analyzer

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