judo

That’s a question that we get quite often when we’re meeting interested coaches and athletes. Often, we end up in quite interesting discussions. Some of our visitors think that Athlete Analyzer Judo is for the very top elite level judokas and their coaches. That’s not the case and during our conversations, they often change their minds and think quite different.

We recommend that judokas start using Athlete Analyzer Judo from 13-14 years and up. In this age, the judoka starts to reflect more about his or her judo and is quite often also changing their judo accordingly to their body growth. Athlete Analyzer Judo makes it easy to highlight both their strengths and weaknesses and that is a strong motivational factor for further training. It’s also easy to spot unwanted patterns like picking up unnecessary shidos during contests. So, it’s a good thing starting as pre-cadet to form a baseline for future training and analysis. But, this is of course quite depending on the ambition level of the judoka.

As the judoka mowing up through cadet and junior level the system makes it easier to get new insights. Some techniques that worked well earlier gets a lower efficiency, new techniques prove to work more efficiently during contests. They also increase their complimentary training making the training plans more complex than before. In this age, they are also more likely to have more coaches around them then before. Maybe they enter a regional team or hopefully even the national team. If the judoka has used AAJ since before the new coaches will have a veritable goldmine of information and can very quickly help the judoka towards their next level.

What about the coaches? Well, AAJ makes collaboration between coaches easier as they can help each other. One coach can plan judo sessions, another coach can plan the strength training and another the cardio within the club. All in one place and easily shared with the judokas. It’s also possible to collaborate between different levels. For instance, a cadet national coach will of course share the training plan to the national cadet team but the coach he can also share the same plan to club coaches. The club coaches can easily adjust the plan accordingly to suit the club and then share it to all cadets in the club. In this way, it’s easy to spread “best practice” among clubs in a country. It’s not always necessary to invent the wheel over and over again.

One thing we all agree on – you never stop learning judo, whatever your current level. There’s always something that can be improved even further and Athlete Analyzer Judo makes it a lot easier as it let the coaches support all their judokas a lot more, in less time.

Nicklas Björklund

Upload of judo matches and video size

by Nicklas Björklund on

To analyze your judo you’ll of course need some data to analyze. All analysis charts displays data from tagged match events from your uploaded match videos so there’s no way around to upload your videos. Over time your tagged match events will provide a great resource in order to analyze your judo in various ways.

Upload your judo videos

The easiest way to get your match videos to our server is to let a friend record your matches from your smartphone and then upload the videos using the app. Just beware that your videos can be large so make sure to use a wifi connection if you don’t have a lot of mobile data. You can also of course upload your judo matches from a computer if you prefer that. Just make sure your computer don’t enter energy save during the upload process as it might interrupt the upload.

Video size

Sometimes your friends will continue to record the match after soremade which often is quite unnecessary, at least for analyzing purposes. In order to keep down the size of your videos there’s a lot of time saving to gain if you just end the recording after soremade. Another tip is to win your matches quick which will result in small and neat video sizes 😉

Some users pause the recording during mate to save video size. This is not recommended because we’ll soon add new charts for analyzing the time during your active and passive periods in your matches. Sometimes if there’s a long break due to injury or the referees having a long discussion or something else you might have to pause but otherwise, keep recording.

You can also experiment which resolution you record your videos in. A high resolution will of course result in a large video size. We recommend that you use 720p resolution which is sufficient in most cases.

You can read more about upload and the video library here

Read more about tagging match events in your videos here

We have recently released “Structured goals” in Athlete Analyzer enabling coaches and athletes to set goals based on their analysis from training and competitions. Having clear goals are highly motivating and also help coaches to collaborate for the benefit for their athletes.

With Athlete Analyzer it’s very easy to analyze an athlete’s scoring in Nage Waza and see their patterns regarding every aspect like throwing directions, kumi kata and much more. The data comes from the tagging of match events in the match videos done by the athletes.

 

Throwing directions judo analyze software

It’s possible to create goals on every aspect regarding scoring in Nage Waza but in this example we can see that the athlete lacks throws at the direction North West and want to set a new goal for increase throws in that direction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We create a fairly straightforward goal of more (3 during the period) Osoto gari at North West using a right neck grip:

Set structured goals for judo

The judoka will now have this new goal:

Goals for Osoto Gari

All coaches with a relation with the athlete can see the goal and can focus the technical training for the athlete on Osoto gari in the dojo.

When the athlete has managed to throw with Osoto gari at North East in a competition the goal starts to be fulfilled:

Goals for judo throw Osoto Gari

When the athlete reach the goal the athlete will receive a badge and all coaches around the athlete will get a notification. This makes it very easy to collaborate between the athlete and all his/her coaches. 

Set goals for Judo Nage waza

 

“Structured goals” in Athlete Analyzer gives you the possibility to set very detailed complex goals regarding Nage Waza, Ne Waza, Competition results, training and other more general goals.

Dr Mike Callan

The importance of goals in judo

by Dr Mike Callan on

As coaches we set goals for our judoka, either instinctively or consciously.

”try to use your ashiwaza in this next randori.”

”first person to score can stay out.”

”you must attack first.”

All coaches will be able to reflect on their own use of such motivational statements, which are actually setting task goals or ego goals for the judoka. Working with more experienced judoka, we often work with them to encourage them to set their own goals for the randori or contest, or competition.

This approach is supported by researchers, for example, Ziv and Lidor in 2013, and Gernigon and colleagues in 2004.

Until now, the available ways that coaches have to measure, record goals and their achievement has been very limited. In the modern world there are plenty of software solutions aimed at supporting the coach, but the unique nature of judo means that technical goals are ignored by  most of the options.

Athlete Analyzer Judo, is designed by judo coaches for judo coaches, and provides coaching tools specific to our crazy sport. Like all good coaches, Nicklas and his team are constantly developing, innovating and experimenting with new approaches. The latest innovation, ”Structured Goals”, takes this software onto another level.

”Structured Goals” builds on what the literature tells us about psychology of judoka, and sports performers, and puts it into a judo-specific format that can be used to deliver ”Evidence Based Coaching”. It allows you to measure the effectiveness of your goal setting and impact on the motivation of judoka.

Good luck in all your efforts.

References

Ziv, G. and Lidor, R. (2013) Psychological Preparation of Competitive judokas – A Review.  Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 12, 371-380
Gernigon, C., d’Arripe-Longueville, F., Delignieres, D. and Ninot, G. (2004) A dynamical systems perspective on goal involvement states in sport. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology 26, 572-596.