Life as a judo coach is very intense where you are responsible for planning, practices and competitions. What can be very time consuming is all the travelling to different training camps and competitions.

One of the biggest advantages with Athlete Analyzer is that I can still follow my pupils progress in training camps and competitions through the video analysis though I am not present on all the events. Its a great tool where I in my obscence still can manage to deliver feedback and also receive information to modify our training methods at home.

Gabriel Bengtsson, Head Coach, Borås Judo Club

 

In Athlete Analyzer all coaches connected to an athlete have access to the athlete’s match videos. It’s easy to give feedback and also create bookmarks in the video for direct access to match situations.

Judo feedback software

 

Give access to your plans to the other coaches. Several coaches in your team can help build the same plan. One can plan all the judo training, another all the strength and conditioning and a third all competitions and camps.

Use week planning. Individual training sessions can often be planned on a week level instead of a day level. Doing so means that you no longer have keep track of your athletes’ weakly schedule and the athletes can plan their week according to their own schedule.

No need to plan everything at once. Athlete Analyzer is built for continual planning and any changes you make to a plan will become available for every follower instantaneously. Plan a only few weeks ahead and then continuously add training sessions by time.

Individual planning. Don’t create training plans for single athletes. Instead go directly to their calendar and plan their training. This saves time for both you and the athlete.

We have recently released “Structured goals” in Athlete Analyzer enabling coaches and athletes to set goals based on their analysis from training and competitions. Having clear goals are highly motivating and also help coaches to collaborate for the benefit for their athletes.

With Athlete Analyzer it’s very easy to analyze an athlete’s scoring in Nage Waza and see their patterns regarding every aspect like throwing directions, kumi kata and much more. The data comes from the tagging of match events in the match videos done by the athletes.

 

Throwing directions judo analyze software

It’s possible to create goals on every aspect regarding scoring in Nage Waza but in this example we can see that the athlete lacks throws at the direction North West and want to set a new goal for increase throws in that direction

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We create a fairly straightforward goal of more (3 during the period) Osoto gari at North West using a right neck grip:

Set structured goals for judo

The judoka will now have this new goal:

Goals for Osoto Gari

All coaches with a relation with the athlete can see the goal and can focus the technical training for the athlete on Osoto gari in the dojo.

When the athlete has managed to throw with Osoto gari at North East in a competition the goal starts to be fulfilled:

Goals for judo throw Osoto Gari

When the athlete reach the goal the athlete will receive a badge and all coaches around the athlete will get a notification. This makes it very easy to collaborate between the athlete and all his/her coaches. 

Set goals for Judo Nage waza

 

“Structured goals” in Athlete Analyzer gives you the possibility to set very detailed complex goals regarding Nage Waza, Ne Waza, Competition results, training and other more general goals.

Dr Mike Callan

The importance of goals in judo

by Dr Mike Callan on

As coaches we set goals for our judoka, either instinctively or consciously.

”try to use your ashiwaza in this next randori.”

”first person to score can stay out.”

”you must attack first.”

All coaches will be able to reflect on their own use of such motivational statements, which are actually setting task goals or ego goals for the judoka. Working with more experienced judoka, we often work with them to encourage them to set their own goals for the randori or contest, or competition.

This approach is supported by researchers, for example, Ziv and Lidor in 2013, and Gernigon and colleagues in 2004.

Until now, the available ways that coaches have to measure, record goals and their achievement has been very limited. In the modern world there are plenty of software solutions aimed at supporting the coach, but the unique nature of judo means that technical goals are ignored by  most of the options.

Athlete Analyzer Judo, is designed by judo coaches for judo coaches, and provides coaching tools specific to our crazy sport. Like all good coaches, Nicklas and his team are constantly developing, innovating and experimenting with new approaches. The latest innovation, ”Structured Goals”, takes this software onto another level.

”Structured Goals” builds on what the literature tells us about psychology of judoka, and sports performers, and puts it into a judo-specific format that can be used to deliver ”Evidence Based Coaching”. It allows you to measure the effectiveness of your goal setting and impact on the motivation of judoka.

Good luck in all your efforts.

References

Ziv, G. and Lidor, R. (2013) Psychological Preparation of Competitive judokas – A Review.  Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 12, 371-380
Gernigon, C., d’Arripe-Longueville, F., Delignieres, D. and Ninot, G. (2004) A dynamical systems perspective on goal involvement states in sport. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology 26, 572-596.

Leaderboards are an easy way to keep track of key indicators for your judokas and are displayed in the coach dashboard. Athlete Analyzer Judo keep track over how many contests each judoka has done, their Ippon rate and much more automatically.

Tip: Be sure to create homogenous groups with your judokas. You can for example create one group of your cadets, one another group for your juniors and so on. You can also divide the groups further with female cadets, male cadets and so on to make each group more comparable. Each judoka can be a member of several groups.

Leaderboard judo analysis software

PDCA (plan-do-check-act) is an iterative four-step management method mainly used in business for continual improvement of processes and products.

One main goal with the design of Athlete Analyzer has been to apply PDCA into the coaching process.

PDCA for judo. Complete judo software for judokas and coaches

Plan – Set the athlete’s goals for the coming period. It’s possible to set goals regarding nearly every aspect in AAJ such as training, technical development, results or general goals. Create training plans supporting the goals and  share everything with all coaches around the athlete.

Do – Implement the training plan. Make sure that the athletes film their contests and let them tag all match events. Look at the contests and give feedback to the athletes (the “Feedback loop”). This is very useful between coaches on different levels (National, Regional & Club levels) and is of course highly motivating for the athletes.

Check – Analyze your athletes regularly and check the progress of their goals (well, you can let the system do it for you and send you emails on a daily, weekly or monthly basis if you are short of time). When the period is over it’s time to sit down and evaluate if the goals are completed or not.

Act – If the CHECK shows that the PLAN that was implemented in DO has lead to an improvement then you might want to continue without any major changes when you create your next plan. If the CHECK shows no improvement or something different than expected then adjust your next plan based on well informed decisions.

So, Athlete Analyzer is not only a software for judo, it’s a method for continual improvement of your athletes.