Judo

Over the last few years we have witnessed a growing professionalization of Judo in its various strands, but most of the times we continue to find a model of “artisan coach”.
 
In the form of artisan education, the path of learning is based on the relationship between the teacher and the student and is essentially practical in nature.
 
This form of artisan education in judo comes from its origin, where a student accumulates the knowledge of the techniques of his master until one day the student becomes instructor.
 
Education through the trade should not be overlooked, but it is not enough for the growing complexity in society and judo in particular.
 
Among the various areas which today a deep knowledge is demanded, urges the technological one. Most probably in our sport this is the least developed area, but I have no doubt that it is one of the most important.
 
This is how Athlete Analyzer, a Swedish Judo software, comes as a fundamental tool for any coach, regardless of the level of your athlete. I must confess that I initially was a bit sceptic myself. I thought I would have too much work and would not have the answers I wanted, but I could not be more wrong.
 
I am not going to explain all the skills or technical characteristics of this program, those responsible for the program have all done well in their communication, I would just like to help spread the word in helping other coaches growth, because it will be my growth as well.
 
I only regret the fact that when I was an athlete I did not have this tool at my disposal, I’m sure the Judo would have been a lot more fun and I would have even been able to go a little further.

Pedro Dias

Head Coach of Sport Algés e Dafundo Judo, Portugal

2008 European bronze medallist in Lisbon

Pedro Dias at the European Judo Championships 2008

12.04.2008 – Pedro DIAS – Campeonato da Europa de Judo.Photo: Carlos Alberto Matos / IMAPRESS

Nicklas Björklund

Upload of judo matches and video size

by Nicklas Björklund on

To analyze your judo you’ll of course need some data to analyze. All analysis charts displays data from tagged match events from your uploaded match videos so there’s no way around to upload your videos. Over time your tagged match events will provide a great resource in order to analyze your judo in various ways.

Upload your judo videos

The easiest way to get your match videos to our server is to let a friend record your matches from your smartphone and then upload the videos using the app. Just beware that your videos can be large so make sure to use a wifi connection if you don’t have a lot of mobile data. You can also of course upload your judo matches from a computer if you prefer that. Just make sure your computer don’t enter energy save during the upload process as it might interrupt the upload.

Video size

Sometimes your friends will continue to record the match after soremade which often is quite unnecessary, at least for analyzing purposes. In order to keep down the size of your videos there’s a lot of time saving to gain if you just end the recording after soremade. Another tip is to win your matches quick which will result in small and neat video sizes 😉

Some users pause the recording during mate to save video size. This is not recommended because we’ll soon add new charts for analyzing the time during your active and passive periods in your matches. Sometimes if there’s a long break due to injury or the referees having a long discussion or something else you might have to pause but otherwise, keep recording.

You can also experiment which resolution you record your videos in. A high resolution will of course result in a large video size. We recommend that you use 720p resolution which is sufficient in most cases.

You can read more about upload and the video library here

Read more about tagging match events in your videos here

Collaboration between coaches and athletes on different levels like national, regional and clubs can be really complex and time consuming. There are many aspects to consider like training plans, technical and tactical improvements but also competition planning and a lot of other things. All information have to be distributed between the levels to make it possible to collaborate.

Even just in a club with several coaches this could a hurdle and take away the some of the focus from what actually matters – the athletes.

Most organisations on different levels have created different administrative routines to manage their work. Often with office software like Word or Excel distributed via home pages or email. Many organisations have one system for reporting training, another system for match analysis and different routines for setting goals and do follow ups regarding technical and tactical aspects of their athletes. Each organisation has created it’s own solution and it’s hard to get an optimized information flow that simplifies collaboration between different levels.

Analyzing judo and training

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most of you will probably recognize the situation illustrated in the picture above. It’s difficult and time consuming to gather all needed information and even more harder to analyze it efficiently. In fact, that’s why we decided to create Athlete Analyzer – a complete judo software to keep everything needed in one place and enhance collaboration.

Training plans & diaries: The coaches create training plans and the athletes reports each workout. If the athletes uses the app they can report their training as done with one click. That’s quite straight forward and forms the base for the training plans and diaries.Coaches can also collaborate while creating plans. One coach can update judo sessions and another coach can update the strength and conditioning sessions. They can also add other events like camps or competitions in the same plan. Every update in the plan will instantly update all athletes calendars. Another collaboration feature is that for example a national coach can share a basic plan like “Build up period Cadets” to club coaches. The club coaches can then share that plan to all their cadets in the club. This saves a lot of time and also spread “Best practices” from national level down to club level.

Match videos: One decision we made early on was to let the athletes analyze and tag their contests by themselves. There are several reasons for this. The athletes need to watch their contests and reflect on what happened. It makes the athletes more engaged and makes it also a lot easier to discuss the situations and the outcome with their coaches. And to be honest, a coach with let’s say ten athletes saves a lot of time if the athletes tag their own contests. All coaches connected to the athlete can then easily analyze the contests and provide valuable feedback. All feedback are displayed below each video in a thread format making it easy to read the other coaches’ feedback.

Development plans & Goals: Coaches and the athletes themselves can set goals for basically every aspect in the system, for example “More Harai goshi from right neck grip”. The system keep track of all tags done by the athlete from the videos and when the goal is met all coaches gets an notification automatically. It also makes it very clear for all coaches around the athlete what they should focus on during future training sessions.

We have made a short video explaining how Athlete Analyzer works. Don’t forget to turn up the volume and please share it among your judo friends.

Dr Mike Callan

The importance of goals in judo

by Dr Mike Callan on

As coaches we set goals for our judoka, either instinctively or consciously.

”try to use your ashiwaza in this next randori.”

”first person to score can stay out.”

”you must attack first.”

All coaches will be able to reflect on their own use of such motivational statements, which are actually setting task goals or ego goals for the judoka. Working with more experienced judoka, we often work with them to encourage them to set their own goals for the randori or contest, or competition.

This approach is supported by researchers, for example, Ziv and Lidor in 2013, and Gernigon and colleagues in 2004.

Until now, the available ways that coaches have to measure, record goals and their achievement has been very limited. In the modern world there are plenty of software solutions aimed at supporting the coach, but the unique nature of judo means that technical goals are ignored by  most of the options.

Athlete Analyzer Judo, is designed by judo coaches for judo coaches, and provides coaching tools specific to our crazy sport. Like all good coaches, Nicklas and his team are constantly developing, innovating and experimenting with new approaches. The latest innovation, ”Structured Goals”, takes this software onto another level.

”Structured Goals” builds on what the literature tells us about psychology of judoka, and sports performers, and puts it into a judo-specific format that can be used to deliver ”Evidence Based Coaching”. It allows you to measure the effectiveness of your goal setting and impact on the motivation of judoka.

Good luck in all your efforts.

References

Ziv, G. and Lidor, R. (2013) Psychological Preparation of Competitive judokas – A Review.  Journal of Sports Science and Medicine 12, 371-380
Gernigon, C., d’Arripe-Longueville, F., Delignieres, D. and Ninot, G. (2004) A dynamical systems perspective on goal involvement states in sport. Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology 26, 572-596.